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The Difference between Mekaphat and Mekasit Part 1: Materials and Properties

The Difference between Mekaphat and Mekasit Part 1: Materials and Properties

 

The Difference between Mekaphat and Mekasit Part 1: Materials and Properties

 

Mekaphat

and Mekasit
are 2 types of alchemical alloys described in ancient Thai sorcery scrolls. When these mystical materials are incorporated into amulets, they are referred to as That Kaiyasit
: or powerful alloys that protect their owners from harm. They also enhance their fortune and prestige.

 

Thais have revered them throughout the ages, and clamored to possess them. Even in the present day, the most common examples still trade for tens of thousands of US dollars among collectors.

“Even in the present day, the most common examples still trade for tens of thousands of US dollars among collectors.”

These amulets are extremely rare, having already been made in very small quantities owing to scarcity of materials, and the rudimentary production techniques of the day. Over the course of the many decades that have passed, even fewer of these treasured artefacts have survived till present-day. Most genuine examples are well over a century old, and many pieces found in the market today are clever replicas, produced to meet incredible demand.

Though these replicas might be a spitting image of the genuine articles, they are not imbued with the same mystical powers, due to missteps and inconsistencies in their crafting and consecration. The consecration process is extremely complex and intensive, and its myriad steps have only ever been revealed to a select handful of spiritual adepts throughout the course of history.

In this article, we discuss the lore surrounding these 2 mystical alloys.

The Mekaphat

According to the Thai sorcery texts, Mekaphat is formed from the smelting and amalgamation of several metals. The resulting alloy is then washed with sulfur, resulting in a shiny black appearance highlighted by a distinct blue gleam. A lab test using XRF Spectrometer determined that Copper (Cu) and Lead (Pb) made up 99% of the total mass of the sample examined. Perhaps that accounts for Mekaphat’s grayish appearance.

The remaining 1% consists of tin, manganese, antimony, gold, silver, nickel, selenium and zinc.

Additional materials may also be added, in accordance with each school’s prescribed texts. Almost all recipes however, involve the inclusion of a small herbal mixture, usually including Zingiber Ottensii Valeton, Smooth/Striped Rattled Pod (Crotalaria), Moke (Wrightia religiosa), Black Galingale or Stephania venosa (Blume) Spreng. Other herbs may be added as well.

The requisite spells are invoked while the materials are mixed. If the ritual succeeds, it will result in a glossy black substance with a blue gleam, that is fragile. As the Mekaphat is polished, it acquires a shade of white or indigo, which will eventually fade to gray, or in some cases, a residue blue gleam.

Example of Mekaphat amulet

Mekaphat is itself imbued with significant spiritual powers, however, it is in sacred and mystical objects that it really shines. Ancient craftsmen often incorporated them into their Phra Krueng, turning them into Phra Nur Mekaphat

. These were believed to bless owners with endless fortunes (Noon Duang
), invulnerability (Kongkrapan Chatree
), and escape from dangers (Klaew klad
).

 

The Mekasit

The composition of Mekasit has been lost to the ravages of time, and no one is really certain what goes into it. The adepts skilled in its craft were extra secretive, even by the standards of spiritual practitioners, and much of the information has never been publicly revealed.

The material possesses a stunning iridescence, displaying at once varying shades of gray-black, golden-green, reddish or purple-green, similar to the color of insect wings. Although it is known to occur in many colours, it is perhaps the golden-green examples that are the most prized.

That is not to say that its composition is total mystery. An XRF Spectrometer analysis recently undertaken at a lab by a Thai amulet enthusiast, determined that Copper (Cu) and Antimony (Sb) together made up 99% of the total mass of the sample examined.

“Mekasit are is believed to turn fate and fortunes in favour of their owners, as well as serve as a foreboding of good tidings and danger alike.”

Scattered information from various sources also seems to indicate that most Mekasit comprises these other materials; Silica, Sulfur, Tellurium, Lead, Silver, Zinc, Copper, and Mercury, although none offer any explanation for the supernatural variety of hues it displays. It can only be speculated that the colourful iridescent came from Antimony and Tellurium, while the smooth shine could probably be contributed by phosphorus mixed with Silica.

See Also

Although is it believed that most examples of Mekasit consist of mercury, this is improbable as mercury, which already exists in liquid form at room temperature, would likely evaporate at the high temperatures required to smelt and combine the other metals with it. It is thus speculated that mercury is only used in the early stages of the creation of the Mekasit, to enable the metals to better incorporate.

Example of Mekasit amulet

Mekasit are is believed to turn fate and fortunes in favour of their owners, as well as serve as a foreboding of good tidings and danger alike. If it displayed a bright colour, prosperity is on the way. A dull, stained colour is considered an ill omen.

It is also known for enhancing Metta Mahaniyom, further protecting its owner from danger and poor fortunes.

Mekasit should be periodically cleaned using only rain water. Some texts claim that if used in conjunction with a Kala Ta Diew

(commonly known as the “One-Eyed Cocunut”) or Rahu amulet, its ability to sustain or turn fortunes, and deflect danger, will be dramatically amplified. In tandem, these amulets will help their owners stave off ill repute and bad luck, and keep backstabbers and meddlesome people at bay.

 

In Part 2, we will explore who were the famous monks who excelled at making such amulets.

 

 

 

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