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Sacred Scrolls – Ten Popular Takrut in Thailand

Sacred Scrolls – Ten Popular Takrut in Thailand

Sacred Scrolls - Ten Popular Takrut in Thailand

Sacred Scrolls - Ten Popular Takrut in Thailand

Takrut are a form of talisman created through the inscription of spells channelling the Buddha’s grace, as well as invoking the blessings and assistance of spiritual beings such as deities and angels.

They are made from various materials, according to the prescribed texts of each school. They have remained one of the most persistent cultural phenomena of Thailand, as they are believed to protect against harm and danger, and attract auspiciousness, manifesting as enhanced Klaw Klad, Kongkraphan Chatree, and even Choklarp.

Traditionally, Takrut were often slung across a shoulder, as a necklace, or fastened around the waist with a simple string.

Modern Takrut have evolved with the fashion of the times, and often take the form of an ornate, beautifully-designed necklace, bracelet, or other accessories. It is because of this adaptability, that Takrut have continued to persist, and perhaps become even more popular, among celebrities and teenagers alike.

Despite the diverse array of powerful Takrut however, some examples stand head and shoulders above the rest. Here are the 10 Takrut in pole position.

Takrut Sorot Mongkon by Luang Pu Eiam, Wat Sapansoong

Takrut Sorot Mongkon by Luang Pu Eiam, Wat Sapansoong

The most cherished among all Takrut. These are made from copper and inscribed with “Yant Sorot Mongkon

” surrounded by the “Itipiso
” spell. Yant Sorot Mongkol is an extremely sacred talisman. Geji of the past considered it a sacred item, that could provide protection and blessings from the 16 Heavens of the “Fine Material World” (Rupa Loka
), and the 15 realms of the “Sensuous World” (Kama Loka
– refer to our detailed explanation of Takrut Sorot Mongkon, that can be found in the upcoming article on Kreung Rang Benja Phakhee).

 

Worshippers of these Takrut, enjoy the full suite of sacredness and protection from evil offered by the powers of Heaven and Earth. All forms of auspiciousness will also seek you out. After all, even gods, deities, and all manner of spiritual beings are duty-bound to respect the talisman contained in this Takrut.

These Takrut have been highly sought-after throughout history. It is said that possessing one of these will bring tremendous good fortune to you and your family, a blessing known as Metta Maha Mongkon

.

 

Takrut Maha Jakkaphat Trathirach by Ajarn Heng Phaiwan

Takrut Maha Jakkaphat Trathirach by Ajarn Heng Phaiwan

Considered to be one of the finest examples of a Takrut crafted by a layman not ordained as a monk. This Takrut is made of gold.

It is inscribed with a sacred Yant considered by many to draw in tremendous blessings. However, due to their extremely advanced age, as well as the princely sum that collectors will often part with for one of these (which means no one would dare risk decimating their value by unrolling them to have a look inside), it is difficult to ascertain the exact nature and specifics of the Yant.

This Takrut bestows outstanding Klaew Klad, Metta Mahaniyom, Maha Ut, Maha Amnaj (supernatural endurance and ferocity), and Kongkrapan.

 

Takrut Maiyarap Sakodthap by Luang Phor Goon, Wat Phranon

Takrut Maiyarap Sakodthap by Luang Phor Goon, Wat Phranon

The spell of this takrut is analogous with its name. Maiyarap Sakodthap refers to the battle where Hanuman clashed with the lord of the underworld Maiyarap (Maiyarap is the name contained in Ramakien

, the Thai re-telling of the Hindu epic Ramayana
) to rescue Phra Ram and Phra Lak. He emerged triumphant, killing Maiyarap and his troops.

 

Inside this Takrut is textured silver that has been covered with knitted rope, before being coated with Rak. It is another famous and highly sought-after Takrut in Thailand, renowned for bestowing protection. If worshipped at home, it is believed to extend these powers of protection over your entire family.

These Takrut also imbue their owners with an aura of ardour and gallantry and causes other people to regard them with kindness, affection, and tenderness. They are said to have the power to make the owner irresistible, effortlessly commanding love and admiration from the people around them.

 

Takrut Koo Cheewit by Luang Phor Phit, Wat Khamang

Takrut Koo Cheewit by Luang Phor Phit, Wat Khamang

This Takrut consists of 2 layers; an outer layer of Lead, and an inner layer of Brass. Spells are inscribed on both layers, before the scrolls are bound with braided rope, and sealed with Rak.

These Takrut are believed to bestow their owners with invulnerability and to aid them in finding partners who will unconditionally love and support them.

 

Takrut by Luang Phor Niam, Wat Noi

Takrut by Luang Phor Niam, Wat Noi

The vast majority of Luang Phor Niam amulets were made from Lead, and his Takrut were no exception.

In his day, lead was lumpy and usually processed with manual labour, as machines to beat the lead smooth had not yet become widely available.

The lead has to be beaten flat and cut into squares by hand, before being inscribed with Yant. These were then rolled up, bound with string, and lacquered with Rak. These scrolls were unusually thick, as a result of this process.

The spells inscribed within call upon the Buddha’s grace, and the Baramee of this Takrut will protect the owner from all danger. It also excels at bestowing outstanding Klaew Klad and Kongkraphan.

 

Takrut Maha Rangab Prab Hongsa by Luang Pu Jai, Wat Sadet

Takrut Maha Rangab Prab Hongsa by Luang Pu Jai, Wat Sadet

This is a large Takrut, approximately 7 inches in length, that has been coated with powder and Rak, before being gilded with gold foil. These amulets’ large size was supposed to enable them to be hung from the masts of fishermen’s boats, as the temple was located near the Tha Chin

River, and most of Luang Phor’s devotees are fishermen.

 

These Takrut were originally meant to keep seafarers safe from marauding pirates and the fury of mother nature. It offers outstanding Klaew Klad, and protects the owner from all forms of danger.

 

Takrut by Luang Pu Suk, Wat Pak Klong Makham Thao

Takrut by Luang Pu Suk, Wat Pak Klong Makham Thao

Luang Pu Suk’s amulets are highly-prized among collectors, and the master himself is widely recognized as a foremost expert of the arcane arts.

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His Takrut are made from lead and then bound with a characteristic rope resembling a Jorakhae Khob Fun

(crocodile gnash). Its mysterious powers are purported to imbue remarkable Metta Mahaniyom and Klaew Klad, and many collectors yearn to own them.

 

Takrut Thong Chat by Luang Phor Thob, Wat Chon Dan

Takrut Thong Chat by Luang Phor Thob, Wat Chon Dan

This style of Takrut is very distinct, and unique to Luang Phor Thob.

These are crafted from sheets amalgamated from copper and lead, which are inscribed with yant, bound into scrolls with sacred rope, and dipped in colours corresponding to the flag of Thailand.

These were originally crafted during a tumultuous era in Thai history, to protect a member of the military from communists and terrorists. There are even accounts of soldiers taking direct hits from the bullet and emerging unharmed while wearing these Takrut on their person.

Because of this fearsome reputation, these Takrut are considered outstanding for Klaew Klad, Maha Ut, and Kongkrapan. These Takrut sealed Luang Phor’s reputation for the ages, and he is still widely revered today.

 

Takrut Maha Prab by Luang Phor Kong, Wat Bang Kaphom

Takrut Maha Prab by Luang Phor Kong, Wat Bang Kaphom

Luang Phor Kong is an expert occultist. His Takrut are famous across Thailand, and demand for them is perennially high. Each Takrut is approximately 3.5 inches long, and coated with a distinct red-black resin, giving it a glossy appearance. It is known for its protective ability, even rendering their owners impervious to harm and danger.

 

Takrut Pok Krang by Luang Phor Thongsuk, Wat Tanod Luang

Takrut Pok Krang by Luang Phor Thongsuk, Wat Tanod Luang

These Takrut is are crafted from 4 types of materials; brass, copper, lead, and palm leaves, and are available in a range of sizes. Brass examples are the most popular.

Though many monks have channelled Wicha similar to the one used in these amulets, these are widely considered to be the finest examples of the form, with countless firsthand accounts of its spiritual prowess. They imbue outstanding levels of Kongkraphan and Klaew Klad, and are renowned for the protection they offer from ghosts and black magic.

The holiness of the above Takrut have been recognized as par excellence, across S.E. Asia, and their popularity continues to grow, despite overlaps in their purported abilities.

They command extremely high prices, often in excess of 1 million Baht. Beyond their powers perhaps, it is the sheer beauty of their craftsmanship, along with their status as treasured antiques of ages past, that had continued to fuel their popularity. One should always be careful to ensure that they are purchasing the genuine article, as fakes abound. After all, everyone always wants a share of the good stuff.

 

(Picture credit: Valadzionak Volha/ Shutterstock.com)

 

 

 

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